When you replace mutt-kz with mutt 1.6.1-2, you may notice a horribly ugly thing appear. Do not panic; just add unset sidebar_visible to your ~/.mutt/muttrc .

Posted Sat Jul 9 22:41:23 2016 Tags: mutt mutt-kz sidebar

This isn't actually answering the question, but it's close. It's also horrible, so whoever adopts Enrico's script should also completely rewrite this or burn it along with the stack of pizza boxes and the grand piano.

Input:

#!/bin/zsh

set -e

PATHS=$(tempfile)
NEWKEYS=$(tempfile)
NEWKEYRING=$(tempfile)
FARTHEST_TEN=$(tempfile)
trap "rm -f ${PATHS} ${NEWKEYS} ${NEWKEYRING} ${FARTHEST_TEN}" EXIT

keyring=${1:-ksp-dc16.gpg}
myfpr=${2:-2100A32C46F895AF3A08783AF6D3495BB0AE9A02}
#keyserver=${3:-http://pool.sks-keyservers.net:11371/}

# this doesn't handle hokey fetch failures
#(for fpr in $(hkt list --keyring ${keyring} --output-format JSON | jq '.[].publickey.fpr')
#do
#  hokey fetch --keyserver "${keyserver}" --validation-method MatchPrimaryKeyFingerprint "${(Q)fpr}"
#done) >${NEWKEYS}
#
#gpg2 --no-default-keyring --keyring ${NEWKEYRING} --import ${NEWKEYS}

cp "${keyring}" "${NEWKEYRING}"
gpg2 --no-default-keyring --keyring ${NEWKEYRING} --refresh

hkt findpaths --keyring ${NEWKEYRING} '' '' '' > ${PATHS}
id=$(awk -F, "/${myfpr})\$/ {sub(/\(/,BLANKY,\$1);print \$1;}" ${PATHS})
grep -e ",\[${id}," -e ",${id}\]" ${PATHS} | sort -n | tail -n 10 > ${FARTHEST_TEN}
targetids=(${(f)"${$((sed 's/^.*\[//;s/,.*$//;' ${FARTHEST_TEN}; sed 's/\])$//;s/.*,//;' ${FARTHEST_TEN}) | sort -n -u | grep -v "^${id}$")}"})
targetfprs=($(for i in ${targetids}; do awk -F, "/\(${i},[^[]/ {sub(/\)/,BLANKY,\$2); print \$2}" ${PATHS}; done))
gpg2 --no-default-keyring --keyring ${NEWKEYRING} --list-keys ${targetfprs}

Output:

pub   rsa4096/0x664F1238AA8F138A 2015-07-14 [SC]
      Key fingerprint = 3575 0B8F B6EF 95FF 16B8  EBC0 664F 1238 AA8F 138A
uid                   [ unknown] Daniel Lange <dl.ml1@usrlocal.de>
sub   rsa4096/0x03BEE1C11DB1954B 2015-07-14 [E]

pub   rsa4096/0xDF23DA3396978EB3 2014-09-05 [SC]
      Key fingerprint = BBBC 58B4 5994 CF9C CC56  BCDA DF23 DA33 9697 8EB3
uid                   [  undef ] Michael Meskes <michael@fam-meskes.de>
uid                   [  undef ] Michael Meskes <meskes@postgresql.org>
uid                   [  undef ] Michael Meskes <michael.meskes@credativ.com>
uid                   [  undef ] Michael Meskes <meskes@debian.org>
sub   rsa4096/0x85C3AFFECF0BF9B5 2014-09-05 [E]
sub   rsa4096/0x35D857C0BBCB3B25 2014-11-04 [S]

pub   rsa4096/0x1E953E27D4311E58 2009-07-12 [SC]
      Key fingerprint = C2FE 4BD2 71C1 39B8 6C53  3E46 1E95 3E27 D431 1E58
uid                   [  undef ] Chris Lamb <chris@chris-lamb.co.uk>
uid                   [  undef ] Chris Lamb <lamby@gnu.org>
uid                   [  undef ] Chris Lamb <lamby@debian.org>
sub   rsa4096/0x72B3DBA98575B3F2 2009-07-12 [E]

pub   rsa4096/0xDF6D76C44D696F6B 2014-08-15 [SC] [expires: 2017-06-03]
      Key fingerprint = 1A6F 3E63 9A44 67E8 C347  6525 DF6D 76C4 4D69 6F6B
uid                   [ unknown] Sven Bartscher <sven.bartscher@weltraumschlangen.de>
uid                   [ unknown] Sven Bartscher <svenbartscher@yahoo.de>
uid                   [ unknown] Sven Bartscher <kritzefitz@debian.org>
sub   rsa4096/0x9E83B071ED764C3A 2014-08-15 [E]
sub   rsa4096/0xAEB25323217028C2 2016-06-14 [S]

pub   rsa4096/0x83E33BD7D4DD4CA1 2015-11-12 [SC] [expires: 2017-11-11]
      Key fingerprint = 0B5A 33B8 A26D 6010 9C50  9C6C 83E3 3BD7 D4DD 4CA1
uid                   [ unknown] Jerome Charaoui <jerome@riseup.net>
sub   rsa4096/0x6614611FBD6366E7 2015-11-12 [E]
sub   rsa4096/0xDB17405204ECB364 2015-11-12 [A] [expires: 2017-11-11]

pub   rsa4096/0xF823A2729883C97C 2014-08-26 [SC]
      Key fingerprint = 8ED6 C3F8 BAC9 DB7F C130  A870 F823 A272 9883 C97C
uid                   [ unknown] Lucas Kanashiro <kanashiro@debian.org>
uid                   [ unknown] Lucas Kanashiro <kanashiro.duarte@gmail.com>
sub   rsa4096/0xEE6E5D1A9C2F5EA6 2014-08-26 [E]

pub   rsa4096/0x2EC0FFB3B7301B1F 2014-08-29 [SC] [expires: 2017-04-06]
      Key fingerprint = 76A2 8E42 C981 1D91 E88F  BA5E 2EC0 FFB3 B730 1B1F
uid                   [ unknown] Niko Tyni <ntyni@debian.org>
uid                   [ unknown] Niko Tyni <ntyni@cc.helsinki.fi>
uid                   [ unknown] Niko Tyni <ntyni@iki.fi>
sub   rsa4096/0x129086C411868FD0 2014-08-29 [E] [expires: 2017-04-06]

pub   rsa4096/0xAA761F51CC10C92A 2016-06-20 [SC] [expires: 2018-06-20]
      Key fingerprint = C9DE 2EA8 93EE 4C86 BE73  973A AA76 1F51 CC10 C92A
uid                   [ unknown] Roger Shimizu <rogershimizu@gmail.com>
sub   rsa4096/0x2C2EE1D5DBE7B292 2016-06-20 [E] [expires: 2018-06-20]
sub   rsa4096/0x05C7FD79DD03C4BB 2016-06-20 [S] [expires: 2016-09-18]

Note that this completely neglects potential victims who are unconnected within the KSP set.

Posted Sun Jun 26 09:52:24 2016 Tags: debconf debconf16 ksp

“I dated Appelbaum!” she said.

“I gotta go,” I said.

Posted Wed Jun 22 06:43:57 2016 Tags:

bind9 in jessie does not support CAA records

Posted Mon May 16 20:18:14 2016 Tags: bind dns rr

The most prevalent Debian architecture in my home is armel and yet I still want armel and powerpc to be removed as release architectures.

Posted Mon Apr 18 00:02:03 2016 Tags: armel ghc powerpc

Sydney Ruth's sister is Nova Rochelle.

Posted Tue Mar 1 04:29:13 2016 Tags:

cryptol is now in testing.

If you hurry, you can contribute to upstream implementations of CAST5 and Twofish before Christmas this Thursday.

Posted Mon Jan 4 20:07:26 2016 Tags: cast5 dsl twofish

24 Dec. 63

Dear Uncle Ron and Aunt Helen,

It has been quite awhile since I have written you folks. I am not too much of one for writing, and when I do write, I keep putting it off, and putting it off; and the next thing you know, the weeks turn into months and then the months into years.

I haven't sent any Christmas cards, so at this time I'll offer my best wishes for the season to you.

It is Christmas Eve and I am working tonight. I will also work New Year's eve and day. It really doesn't seem like Christmas here, and there isn't that much to do in the evening's; So I'm just as well off working.

As I had mentioned, I had intended to send you some coins from Korea but I believe that I put them in with a package that I had sent to Mom and told her to give them to you. In any event, here are some in this box.

The Korean coin with the 10 on it is 10 Won, and worth about $.0769. The large copper coin is Japanese ( 10 Yen) and about 2.8¢ Wait! I was wrong on the Korean coins.They are 10 Hwan which is the old money. When they Changed to Won, they made 10 Hwan equal to 1 Won. (Sounds confusing and tongue-tying, doesn't it?) So these 10 copper pieces with the 10 on them altogether are only worth 7¢/

The Viet Namese coins with the former president Diem picture on them are soon being taken out of circulation. ( Since he was overthrown and killed, they are going to replace the money also.) The small pieces marked 1 dong are 1 piastre; also called one Viet Namese dollar. 1 piastre is about .7¢. I also recall sending some coins home in my hold baggage. I'll tell Mom to look for them and give them to you.

Now that I look back on it, the year I spent in Korea wasn't bad. It was difficult at first having to work for an arrogant Jew boss, but after a few months I got out of his office and was on my own working directly for the army people ( U.S.) The country of Korea isn't too bad. As you can see on the coins they were in the year 4294 last year. It is surprising for a civilization to be that far along in years and still live under very primitive conditions. Going from Korea to Japan is like going from the dark ages into the future science fiction world. Those people are really progressing in Japan. I spent several days in Japan after I left Korea. Then I went to Honolulu for almost a month. Then I went back to Japan for Leave for 3 weeks and then down here to Viet Nam in October. They were building like crazy in Japan to get ready for the Olympics. Working 4 hours a day, 7 days a week on construction. You could drive into Tokyo early in the evening and return late in the night and find the road you had gone in on was now completely torn away. And downtown Tokyo is vey nice. Lots of modern building and just about any modern gadget you can think of.

I really like their cooking also. Their Kobe Beef is excellent. In this beef, the cattle are pampered from the time they are born until they are slaughtered. They massage them, feed them beer, and let them live a lazy life. I would really like to work a year or two in Japan. The hot baths and big tubs are also great. Only it is almost impossible to stand the hot temperatures that they can. Westerners always have to add quite a lot of cold water before they can get in the tub.

The Viet Namese people are much dirtier than the Japanese or Koreans. They don't have any hot baths here in Viet Nam. In fact, the majority of hotels ( built by the French) don't even have hot water in them. The Korean houses don't look like much from the outside, but inside they are spotlessly clean. The older Japanese buildings look nic efrom the outside and are also clean inside.

I am here in the town of Nha Trang. It is a small town on the coast of the China Sea. I like it here. My hotel is less than a hundred yards from the beach. We are now in the winter season also, but it just got a little cooler from having winds the past few weeks. This afternoon as we came to work there were all sorts of people in swimming.

Lobster is also plentiful here and I eat quite a bit of it. Most of the restaurant make a creamed corn soup with lots of chunks of crab meat in it. This is very good.

Being out here in Nha Trang, we missed the coup d'etat. Things were quiet here and the only way we knew what was happening was to listen to the radio and talk to our co-workers of our radio system in Saigon. When they lifted martial law and the curfew in Saigon, it took them several days later to follow suit here.

There seems to be a noticed improvement since the coup. The people in general seem much happier and there appears to be much more general activity going on.

Well, I guess that's about it for now. I think I may have some Korean Won notes back in my room and I'll check and enclose them if I can find them.

Say hello to Ira & family when you see them, and also to Aunt Marie if she is still there with you.

'Bye for now

Your nephew

PS The Viet Namese coins with 50 XU on them are ½ piastres.

Posted Wed Dec 30 00:28:50 2015 Tags: viet yuletide

Kurt has trouble keeping his mouth shut. This became widely apparent when he was expelled from Catholic school for telling a visiting dignitary to go fuck himself.

WB used to preach angrily against casual sex.

Kurt enlisted in the Army, and due to his high IQ he ended up in the Army Security Agency. After training, he was stationed in Germany where he performed signals intelligence functions like direction finding and passing on information to the CIA and NSA.

One day WB shagged a boy with a leather hat.

Contrary to what one might assume, Kurt had awareness of consequences. He refused officer training because that would have extended his commitment from 4 to 6 years. He purposefully flunked his French language proficiency exam. He wanted there to be no chance of him getting transferred to Vietnam.

The following day, WB found herself confronted and asked to explain why she had had a change of heart about casual sex. Oh, it wasn't casual sex, she explained. He came over and said, “I've been dying to make love with you for the past three hours,” so it was special, she clarified. Thus the nature of the past communication failure became clear to everyone but WB.

Despite all his efforts to avoid Vietnam, Kurt, of course, had trouble keeping his mouth shut. So in 1967 he pissed off the wrong person and found himself having to choose between Leavenworth and Saigon. He chose life of alcoholism over prison.

Posted Thu Dec 24 18:16:17 2015 Tags: asa rdf sigint